THE ELASMODIVER SHARK AND RAY FIELD GUIDE

 

SHARK GUIDE

SHARK PICTURES

WHAT'S NEW?

SHARK BLOG

MERCHANDISE

SHARK TRIPS

SITE MAP

E-MAIL

 

 SHARK INFO

SHARK & RAY FIELD GUIDE

SHARK PICTURE DATABASE

SHARK TAXONOMY

SHARK

BIOLOGY

SHARK EVOLUTION

SHARK FACTS FOR KIDS

 

SHARK DIVING

SHARK DIVING EXPEDITIONS

SHARK DIVING 101

SHARK DIVING HOTSPOTS

SHARK DIVING STORIES

SHARK FEEDING ADVICE

SHARK

ATTACKS

 

CONSERVATION

SHARKS UNDER THREAT

PREDATORS IN PERIL

 

PHOTOGRAPHY

SHARK PHOTO TIPS

DAILY SHARK IMAGES

 

RESOURCES

SHARK NEWS

SHARK LINKS

SHARK BOOKS

SHARK FILMS

SHARK TERMS

 

WEB STUFF

CONTACT ELASMODIVER

ABOUT ELASMODVR

ANDY MURCH ELASMO GEEK

 

WHAT IS ELASMODIVER?

Not just a huge collection of Shark Pictures: Elasmodiver.com contains images of sharks, skates, rays, and a few chimaera's from around the world. Elasmodiver began as a simple web based shark field guide to help divers find the best places to encounter the different species of sharks and rays that live in shallow water but it has slowly evolved into a much larger project containing information on all aspects of shark diving and shark photography.

There are now more than 10,000 shark pictures  and sections on shark evolution, biology, and conservation. There is a large library of reviewed shark books, a constantly updated shark taxonomy page, a monster list of shark links, and deeper in the site there are numerous articles and stories about shark encounters. Elasmodiver is now so difficult to check for updates, that new information and pictures are listed on an Elasmodiver Updates Page that can be accessed here:

WHAT'S NEW?

Shark picture - green sawfish

_

 

 

 

BLACKTIP SHARK

View all available BLACKTIP SHARK PICTURES in the SHARK PICTURE DATABASE

Common Names: Blacktip shark.

Latin Name: Carcharhinus limbatus.  

Family: Carcharhinidae  

Identification: Black tips of pectorals, second dorsal, and lower caudal fin. All other fins may also be edged in black or appear dusky. Snout long and pointed. Upper body gray to  light gray with a distinct white streak present from above the pectoral fins backwards joining the white underbelly half way to the tail. No interdorsal ridge. First dorsal fin high and pointed.

Size: Maximum length 260cm. Size at birth 38-72cm.   

Habitat:  Turbid inshore waters, lagoons, reef channels, reef drop offs and seamounts.  To 30m.

Abundance and distribution: Circumtropical and temperate.

Behavior:  Diet consists primarily of fish including small sharks and rays. Also consume crustaceans and snails and octopus. At Rangiroa the Blacktip passes out of the lagoon on the ebbing tide to cruise the reef face. More active during daylight hours.

Reproduction: Viviparous. Recorded litter size 1 - 10. Gestation period 11 - 12 months.

Conservation Status: Considered 'Near Threatened' by the IUCN. In the western North Atlantic this species has long been important in the recreational fishery and now is a primary target of the directed commercial fishery along the southeast coast from South Carolina to Florida and throughout the Gulf of Mexico (Branstetter and Burgess 1996, 1997). It is the second most important commercially landed species in that region after the Sandbar Shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus) and its meat is considered superior to the latter species. In the USA, Blacktip Shark other carcharhinid meat is often sold under the name ?Blacktip Shark? because of wide consumer preference for the product. It is a significant constituent of the substantial Mexican shark catch, from both Atlantic and Pacific coasts. Elsewhere, it is the most commonly caught species in the large Indian fishery (Hanfee 1996), occasionally caught in the Mediterranean Sea driftnet fishery (Walker et al. 2005), and surely constitutes a sizeable portion of the catch in smaller scale and artisanal fisheries throughout the northern Indian Ocean and South China Sea. In Australia, it represents a minor component of the shark catch in northern Australia (Last and Stevens 1994). Blacktip Shark meat is primarily consumed locally and fins are dried and shipped to the Far East where they are used in preparing shark-fin soup. In some areas the hides are utilised in preparing leather and the livers are used to extract oil.

Citation: Burgess, H. G. & Branstetter, S. 2009. Carcharhinus limbatus. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>

Photographs: Aliwal Shoal, Umkomaas, South Africa.

Similar species: In the Caribbean the Blacktip is often confused with the Caribbean reef shark (C.perezi) which is not as slender and long in front of the eyes and has a less pronounced white stripe on its flank. Many other Carchhinids around the world are also hard to distinguish from the blacktip shark. Commonly confused species include the Grey reef (C.amblyrhynchos) and the Galapagos shark (C.galapagensis). Fin tip coloration and proportion is the best clue.

Reaction to divers: Varied. Usually extremely shy but during some encounters the Blacktip shark can become aggressive making close passes and bumping divers. 

Diving logistics: Although blacktip sharks are generally unapproachable, during shark feeds in Aliwal Shoal, South Africa,  blacktip sharks will either ignore divers completely or investigate them. There are a number of operators that feed the sharks and the different operators often feed in close proximity to one another. This cooperative arrangement keeps the sharks in one spot rather than splitting the resident populations in smaller groups.

Perhaps the best known shark feeder in the region is Walter Bernardis who runs African Water Sports.

blacktip shark feed

 

 

 SHARK TRIPS

Sawfish Diving
 

MORE EXPEDITIONS

 

 

 

SPONSORS

 

ADVERTISERS

 

ELASMO-BLOGS

SharkPictures   Shark & Ray Field Guide   SharkPhotography   SharkDiving   Taxonomy   Evolution   Biology   SharkAttacks   Books   Shark Movies   Stories   Extinction   Protection   Updates   SiteMap

 

CONTACT ELASMODIVER

elasmodiver@gmail.com

250-588-8267

P.O.Box 8719 Station Central, Victoria, BC., V8W 3S3, Canada