THE ELASMODIVER SHARK AND RAY FIELD GUIDE

 

SHARK GUIDE

SHARK PICTURES

WHAT'S NEW?

SHARK BLOG

MERCHANDISE

SHARK TRIPS

SITE MAP

E-MAIL

 

 SHARK INFO

SHARK & RAY FIELD GUIDE

SHARK PICTURE DATABASE

SHARK TAXONOMY

SHARK

BIOLOGY

SHARK EVOLUTION

SHARK FACTS FOR KIDS

 

SHARK DIVING

SHARK DIVING EXPEDITIONS

SHARK DIVING 101

SHARK DIVING HOTSPOTS

SHARK DIVING STORIES

SHARK FEEDING ADVICE

SHARK

ATTACKS

 

CONSERVATION

SHARKS UNDER THREAT

PREDATORS IN PERIL

 

PHOTOGRAPHY

SHARK PHOTO TIPS

DAILY SHARK IMAGES

 

RESOURCES

SHARK NEWS

SHARK LINKS

SHARK BOOKS

SHARK FILMS

SHARK TERMS

 

WEB STUFF

CONTACT ELASMODIVER

ABOUT ELASMODVR

ANDY MURCH ELASMO GEEK

 

WHAT IS ELASMODIVER?

Not just a huge collection of Shark Pictures: Elasmodiver.com contains images of sharks, skates, rays, and a few chimaera's from around the world. Elasmodiver began as a simple web based shark field guide to help divers find the best places to encounter the different species of sharks and rays that live in shallow water but it has slowly evolved into a much larger project containing information on all aspects of shark diving and shark photography.

There are now more than 10,000 shark pictures  and sections on shark evolution, biology, and conservation. There is a large library of reviewed shark books, a constantly updated shark taxonomy page, a monster list of shark links, and deeper in the site there are numerous articles and stories about shark encounters. Elasmodiver is now so difficult to check for updates, that new information and pictures are listed on an Elasmodiver Updates Page that can be accessed here:

WHAT'S NEW?

Shark picture - green sawfish

_

 

 

 

JENKINS WHIPRAY

 

View all available Jenkins Whipray Pictures in the Shark Pictures Database

Common Names: Jenkins' whipray, brown stingray, roughback stingray.

Latin Name: Himantura jenkinsii.

Family: Dasyatidae.

Identification: Rhomboid disc with rounded tips. Anterior margin almost straight. Dorsum yellowish to brown to tan sometimes with richer mottling towards edges and a distinct white margin. Tail whip-like with no finfolds tapering to a dark grey or black. One to three barbs. Row of enlarged denticles running from behind head along tail.

Size: Max disc width 1.5m  

Habitat: Prefers coastal lagoons with sandy or silty substrates. Sometimes found adjacent to rocky reefs.

Abundance and distribution: Indo Pacific region from Southern Africa to Australia. In Australian waters from Coral bay around the north coast to Cape Tribulation.

Vulnerability: The IUCN lists the Jenkins whipray as 'Least Concern' globally but 'Vulnerable' in some regions. Taken as a utilised bycatch of tangle/gillnet, trawlnet, and dropline fisheries throughout Southeast Asia and parts of the Indian Ocean. Inshore fishing pressure is intense throughout this species' range in these areas. It is caught in particularly high numbers in the target fishery for rhynchobatids operating in the Arafura Sea. Although no species-specific data are available, overall catches of stingrays are reported to be declining, with fishermen having to travel further and further to sustain catch levels. This species is highly sought after in Southeast Asia for the high value of its skin. Given continuing high levels of exploitation throughout its range in Southeast Asia and evidence for declines in catches of stingrays, this sub-population is assessed as Vulnerable. Little is known of the population off southeastern Africa, although the species is probably taken as bycatch of shrimp trawlers there. Fisheries in northern Australia are generally well managed and the introduction of Turtle Exclusion Devices (TEDs) and other exclusion devices will have greatly reduced bycatch of this species. The species is considered at minimal threat throughout its wide range off northern Australia, where it is assessed as Least Concern because there is no information to suggest that this sub-population has declined. Overall, the extent of global decline is not considered sufficient to meet the threat criteria and the species is assessed as Least Concern globally due to its wide range off northern Australia.

Citation: Manjaji, B.M., Fahmi & White, W.T. 2009. Himantura jenkinsii. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>

Reproduction: Ovoviviparous.

Photographs: Exmouth Navy Pier, W.A.  

Similar species: The Australian book of Fishes lists a similar species living in the region. In the text of this book the Jenkins' whipray is listed as having a distinctive white tail barb. This suggests that the species photographed above may in fact have been misidentified or its tail barb may be missing.

Reaction to divers:  I found this ray milling around under a school of baitfish. It was fine with my presence until I approached within a few feet. 

Diving logistics: Often spotted at the pier in Exmouth, W.A.  and at other reef dives in the area. Contact Exmouth Dive Centre for more information.

 

HOME     LINKS     TAXONOMY      UNDER THREAT     BOOKS     CONTACT

 SHARK TRIPS

Sawfish Diving
 

MORE EXPEDITIONS

 

 

 

SPONSORS

 

ADVERTISERS

 

ELASMO-BLOGS

SharkPictures   Shark & Ray Field Guide   SharkPhotography   SharkDiving   Taxonomy   Evolution   Biology   SharkAttacks   Books   Shark Movies   Stories   Extinction   Protection   Updates   SiteMap

 

CONTACT ELASMODIVER

elasmodiver@gmail.com

250-588-8267

P.O.Box 8719 Station Central, Victoria, BC., V8W 3S3, Canada