THE ELASMODIVER SHARK AND RAY FIELD GUIDE

 

SHARK GUIDE

SHARK PICTURES

WHAT'S NEW?

SHARK BLOG

MERCHANDISE

SHARK TRIPS

SITE MAP

E-MAIL

 

 SHARK INFO

SHARK & RAY FIELD GUIDE

SHARK PICTURE DATABASE

SHARK TAXONOMY

SHARK

BIOLOGY

SHARK EVOLUTION

SHARK FACTS FOR KIDS

 

SHARK DIVING

SHARK DIVING EXPEDITIONS

SHARK DIVING 101

SHARK DIVING HOTSPOTS

SHARK DIVING STORIES

SHARK FEEDING ADVICE

SHARK

ATTACKS

 

CONSERVATION

SHARKS UNDER THREAT

PREDATORS IN PERIL

 

PHOTOGRAPHY

SHARK PHOTO TIPS

DAILY SHARK IMAGES

 

RESOURCES

SHARK NEWS

SHARK LINKS

SHARK BOOKS

SHARK FILMS

SHARK TERMS

 

WEB STUFF

CONTACT ELASMODIVER

ABOUT ELASMODVR

ANDY MURCH ELASMO GEEK

 

WHAT IS ELASMODIVER?

Not just a huge collection of Shark Pictures: Elasmodiver.com contains images of sharks, skates, rays, and a few chimaera's from around the world. Elasmodiver began as a simple web based shark field guide to help divers find the best places to encounter the different species of sharks and rays that live in shallow water but it has slowly evolved into a much larger project containing information on all aspects of shark diving and shark photography.

There are now more than 10,000 shark pictures  and sections on shark evolution, biology, and conservation. There is a large library of reviewed shark books, a constantly updated shark taxonomy page, a monster list of shark links, and deeper in the site there are numerous articles and stories about shark encounters. Elasmodiver is now so difficult to check for updates, that new information and pictures are listed on an Elasmodiver Updates Page that can be accessed here:

WHAT'S NEW?

Shark picture - green sawfish

_

 

 

 

Pitted Stingray

 

View all available Pitted Stingray Images in the Shark Picture Database

 

Common Names: Pitted stingray.

 

Scientific Name: Dasyatis matsubarai. Some scientists consider D.multispinosa to be a synonym.

 

Family: Dasyatidae.

 

Identification: The pitted stingray has a rhomboid disc with a mildly convex leading edge with a bluntly rounded snout. The trailing edges of its pectoral fins are more noticeably convex. The dorsal surface of the body disc is uniformly dark grey with a line of small white spots (small pores ringed in white) on each pectoral fin running diagonally from midway along the anterior margin to the base of the tail. In mature adults, a row of tubercles run along the snout, back and tail (anterior to the first tail spine).

Ventral surface of disc white with a distinctive W shaped groove posterior to 5th gill slit.

Upper surface of tail has 1-3 stinging spines. Ventral finfold on tail shallow and roughly half as long as disc length. When intact, tail terminates in a thin caudal filament.

 

Size: Maximum disc width 1.2m.

 

Habitat: Found from the surface to at least 60m. Generally caught between 40-60m. Demersal on sandy substrate but a specimen from the Sea of Japan was caught near the surface over 3000m of water suggesting that this species may be semi-pelagic in nature.

 

Abundance and Distribution: Restricted to the northwest Pacific. Relatively common around Honshu and Hokkaido Islands in Japan. Also recorded from South Korea and Vladivostok in western Russia.

 

Diet: Unknown. Presumably benthic invertebrates and small fishes.

Reproduction: Ovoviviparous.

 

Conservation Status: Little historical catch data is available for the pitted stingray therefore it is listed as 'Data Deficient' by the IUCN at this time. However, this species is captured as bycatch in longline, coastal gillnet and set-net fisheries within its range. It is often captured by set-nets and, when caught, the species is retained, landed and marketed. Stingrays are among the dominant batoid components of landings in Japan, however, the relative importance of species on a regional basis is poorly known and species-specific landing data are virtually non-existent (H. Ishihara, pers. obs. 2007).

 

Photographs: Ito, Chiba Prefecture, Japan. This specimen was released from fishing bycatch.

Similar species: There are two other species of stingrays caught around Honshu Island in the Sea of Japan. The red stingray Dasyatis akajei is the most common. It has a reddish brown dorsum with a more pointed snout than the pitted stingray and lacks white spots.

 

Reaction to divers: Not applicable.

 

Diving Logistics: The pitted stingray generally lives in water too deep for observation by scuba divers but it may be encountered by divers venturing onto the sand in deep water at dive sites on the south side of Honshu in Japan. Try contacting dive shops on the Izu and Chiba Peninsulas for more information.

 

References and Citations:

  • Compagno, L.J.V., Ishihara, H., Tanaka, S. & Orlov, A. 2009. Dasyatis matsubarai. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2015.1. <www.iucnredlist.org>.

 

HOME     LINKS     TAXONOMY     BOOKS     CONTACT

 

 

 SHARK TRIPS

Sawfish Diving
 

MORE EXPEDITIONS

 

 

 

SPONSORS

 

ADVERTISERS

 

ELASMO-BLOGS

SharkPictures   Shark & Ray Field Guide   SharkPhotography   SharkDiving   Taxonomy   Evolution   Biology   SharkAttacks   Books   Shark Movies   Stories   Extinction   Protection   Updates   SiteMap

 

CONTACT ELASMODIVER

elasmodiver@gmail.com

250-588-8267

P.O.Box 8719 Station Central, Victoria, BC., V8W 3S3, Canada