THE ELASMODIVER SHARK AND RAY FIELD GUIDE

 

SHARK GUIDE

SHARK PICTURES

WHAT'S NEW?

SHARK BLOG

MERCHANDISE

SHARK TRIPS

SITE MAP

E-MAIL

 

 SHARK INFO

SHARK & RAY FIELD GUIDE

SHARK PICTURE DATABASE

SHARK TAXONOMY

SHARK

BIOLOGY

SHARK EVOLUTION

SHARK FACTS FOR KIDS

 

SHARK DIVING

SHARK DIVING EXPEDITIONS

SHARK DIVING 101

SHARK DIVING HOTSPOTS

SHARK DIVING STORIES

SHARK FEEDING ADVICE

SHARK

ATTACKS

 

CONSERVATION

SHARKS UNDER THREAT

PREDATORS IN PERIL

 

PHOTOGRAPHY

SHARK PHOTO TIPS

DAILY SHARK IMAGES

 

RESOURCES

SHARK NEWS

SHARK LINKS

SHARK BOOKS

SHARK FILMS

SHARK TERMS

 

WEB STUFF

CONTACT ELASMODIVER

ABOUT ELASMODVR

ANDY MURCH ELASMO GEEK

 

WHAT IS ELASMODIVER?

Not just a huge collection of Shark Pictures: Elasmodiver.com contains images of sharks, skates, rays, and a few chimaera's from around the world. Elasmodiver began as a simple web based shark field guide to help divers find the best places to encounter the different species of sharks and rays that live in shallow water but it has slowly evolved into a much larger project containing information on all aspects of shark diving and shark photography.

There are now more than 10,000 shark pictures  and sections on shark evolution, biology, and conservation. There is a large library of reviewed shark books, a constantly updated shark taxonomy page, a monster list of shark links, and deeper in the site there are numerous articles and stories about shark encounters. Elasmodiver is now so difficult to check for updates, that new information and pictures are listed on an Elasmodiver Updates Page that can be accessed here:

WHAT'S NEW?

Shark picture - green sawfish

_

 

 

 

WHITESADDLED CATSHARK

Whitesaddled Catshark

View all available Whitesaddled Catshark Images in the Shark Picture Database

Common Names: Whitesaddled catshark, western catshark, white saddled catshark.

Latin Name: Scyliorhinus hesperius.

Family: Scyliorhinidae.

Identification: A small predominantly cream to beige coloured catshark. Eight or nine squarish dark brown saddles with small lighter spots. Spots may be numerous or sparse. Much lighter diffuse saddles inbetween (hence common name). Flanks are slightly lighter than upper dorsal region, with a network of light spots that may form a honeycomb pattern. Ventral surface pale. First dorsal originates Behind pelvic fin axis. Second dorsal much smaller than first. Teeth have 5 cusps; the central cusp being much larger than the others.

Size: Females reach at least 47cm.

Habitat:  Continental slope from 274-457m. Lack of larger specimens in trawls implies that adults inhabit steep or rough terrain not suitable for trawl fishing.

Distribution: Western Atlantic. Mostly Caribbean coast of Central America from Honduras to Colombia. However, I encountered three whitesaddled catsharks in Guatemala while accompanying gill netters in Quetzalito near Puerto Barrios. All were fished up in one gill net from approximately 200m. 1985 two specimens were captured in South Carolina during an experimental crab fishing survey suggesting that the range of Scyliorhinus hesperius may be much more widespread than initially thought.

Behavior:  Unknown due to paucity of collected specimens.

Reproduction: Unknown but almost certainly oviparous. The whitesaddled catshark's egg cases are probably laid in pairs.

Conservation Status: Listed as 'Data Deficient' by the IUCN. Rarely encountered and of no interest to fisheries (Compagno, in prep. b). Springer (1979) suggests that the absence of adults in trawl catches may indicate that adults occupy habitat unfavourable to trawling.

Photographs: Quetzalito, Guatemala.

Similar species: The closest relative of the whitesaddled catshark is the chain catshark - Scyliorhinus retifer. S.retifer has a predominently plain tan body with a chain-like pattern of dark brown lines.

Other species that occur in the area include the Antilles catshark Galeus antillensis (large dark blotches on back), Roughtail catshark Galeus arae (similar to G.antillensis), Longfin sawtail catshark G.cadenati (joined brown saddles along back), Boa catshark Scyliorhinus boa (dusky saddles fringed in small dark spots), Blotched catshark S.meadi (joined dusky saddles along back), Dwarf catshark S.torrei (dark and light saddles covered in fine white spots) and the Cuban ribbontail catshark Eridacnis barbouri (a thin bodied shark with a variegated tail). The whitesaddled catshark also shares some of its range with various abyssal catsharks (apristurus species) but these are generally dark bodied and live in much deeper water.

Reaction to divers: Unknown.

Diving logistics: The whitesaddled catshark inhabits depths beyond the range of recreational scuba divers. If you encounter this catshark in the wild please email elasmodiver.

HOME     LINKS     TAXONOMY      UNDER THREAT     BOOKS     CONTACT

 

 SHARK TRIPS

Sawfish Diving
 

MORE EXPEDITIONS

 

 

 

SPONSORS

 

ADVERTISERS

 

ELASMO-BLOGS

SharkPictures   Shark & Ray Field Guide   SharkPhotography   SharkDiving   Taxonomy   Evolution   Biology   SharkAttacks   Books   Shark Movies   Stories   Extinction   Protection   Updates   SiteMap

 

CONTACT ELASMODIVER

elasmodiver@gmail.com

250-588-8267

P.O.Box 8719 Station Central, Victoria, BC., V8W 3S3, Canada