THE ELASMODIVER SHARK AND RAY FIELD GUIDE

 

SHARK GUIDE

SHARK PICTURES

WHAT'S NEW?

SHARK BLOG

MERCHANDISE

SHARK TRIPS

SITE MAP

E-MAIL

 

 SHARK INFO

SHARK & RAY FIELD GUIDE

SHARK PICTURE DATABASE

SHARK TAXONOMY

SHARK

BIOLOGY

SHARK EVOLUTION

SHARK FACTS FOR KIDS

 

SHARK DIVING

SHARK DIVING EXPEDITIONS

SHARK DIVING 101

SHARK DIVING HOTSPOTS

SHARK DIVING STORIES

SHARK FEEDING ADVICE

SHARK

ATTACKS

 

CONSERVATION

SHARKS UNDER THREAT

PREDATORS IN PERIL

 

PHOTOGRAPHY

SHARK PHOTO TIPS

DAILY SHARK IMAGES

 

RESOURCES

SHARK NEWS

SHARK LINKS

SHARK BOOKS

SHARK FILMS

SHARK TERMS

 

WEB STUFF

CONTACT ELASMODIVER

ABOUT ELASMODVR

ANDY MURCH ELASMO GEEK

 

WHAT IS ELASMODIVER?

Not just a huge collection of Shark Pictures: Elasmodiver.com contains images of sharks, skates, rays, and a few chimaera's from around the world. Elasmodiver began as a simple web based shark field guide to help divers find the best places to encounter the different species of sharks and rays that live in shallow water but it has slowly evolved into a much larger project containing information on all aspects of shark diving and shark photography.

There are now more than 10,000 shark pictures  and sections on shark evolution, biology, and conservation. There is a large library of reviewed shark books, a constantly updated shark taxonomy page, a monster list of shark links, and deeper in the site there are numerous articles and stories about shark encounters. Elasmodiver is now so difficult to check for updates, that new information and pictures are listed on an Elasmodiver Updates Page that can be accessed here:

WHAT'S NEW?

Shark picture - green sawfish

_

 

 

 

BLACKTIP REEF SHARK

blacktip reef shark

View all available blacktip reef shark images in the Shark Pictures Database

Common Names: Blacktip reef shark, Indo-Pacific blacktip shark, blacktip shark.

Latin Name: Carcharhinus melanopterus

Family: Carcharhinidae  

Identification: Well defined black tips on all fins. Dorsal fin tip black/white demarcation line extremely distinct and unique.Dorsal coloration grey/tan. Ventrum white. Snout short and bluntly rounded.

Size: Maximum length 2m. Size at birth 45-75cm.  

Habitat: Very shallow coral reef flats and slopes. Occasionally on deeper reefs and in brackish water.

Distribution: Indo-west Pacific Red Sea to southern East Africa including Madagascar. Present along much of the shallow coastline of the Indian Ocean and throughout South East Asia from Southern Japan to northern Australia. Abundant in many South Pacific Island chains including much of French Polynesia. Also present in the Mediterranean (via the Suez Canal).

Behavior:  Swims constantly either alone or in small groups. Does not school.

Reproduction: Viviparous. Litter number 2-4.

Conservation Status: Near Threatened. According to the IUCN, the Blacktip Reef Shark is not a target of major fisheries, but is regularly caught by inshore fisheries in India and Thailand (Compagno 1984b). It is rarely taken by northern Australian gillnet fisheries because of its shallow habitat (Last and Stevens 1994). Although this species is used fresh and dry salted for human consumption and for its liver-oil (Last and Stevens 1994) it is considered to be of little commercial importance (Lyle 1987). Data concerning the take of this species in artisanal fisheries is scarce, but due to its inshore, shallow water habitat it is likely to be a target of such activities. However, it is common in tropical and subtropical waters and not, therefore, considered to be in any immediate danger of serious population depletion worldwide.

Photographs: Fakarava, French Polynesia.

Similar species: The grey reef shark, Galapagos shark and a number of other rarely seen carcharhinids share its indo Pacific range but the blacktip reef shark's clearly defined fin tips make it vitually impossible to misidentify.   

Reaction to divers: Blacktip reef sharks may make close passes out of curiosity but they generally keep their distance when pursued unless food is introduced.

Diving logistics:

There are hundreds of locations where blacktip reef sharks can be encountered by divers. One of the easiest locations to get close to them is at a site called the Swimming Pool near Tumakohua Pass on Fakarava, French Polynesia. The sharks can be encountered at close quarters in between dives just by slapping the surface of the sea with an open palm.

Also at this location, upwards of 500 sharks can be seen during a drift through the pass. Other species that you are likely to encounter on the same dive include silvertip sharks, blacktips, and reef whitetips. There are a handful of dive shops on Fakarava that dive the pass.

 

References and further reading:   .

IUCN Redlist. http://www.iucnredlist.org/apps/redlist/details/39375/0

Sharks of the World - Leonard Compagno et al.

HOME     LINKS     TAXONOMY      UNDER THREAT     BOOKS     CONTACT

 SHARK TRIPS

Sawfish Diving
 

MORE EXPEDITIONS

 

 

 

SPONSORS

 

ADVERTISERS

 

ELASMO-BLOGS

SharkPictures   Shark & Ray Field Guide   SharkPhotography   SharkDiving   Taxonomy   Evolution   Biology   SharkAttacks   Books   Shark Movies   Stories   Extinction   Protection   Updates   SiteMap

 

CONTACT ELASMODIVER

elasmodiver@gmail.com

250-588-8267

P.O.Box 8719 Station Central, Victoria, BC., V8W 3S3, Canada