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WHAT IS ELASMODIVER?

Not just a huge collection of Shark Pictures: Elasmodiver.com contains images of sharks, skates, rays, and a few chimaera's from around the world. Elasmodiver began as a simple web based shark field guide to help divers find the best places to encounter the different species of sharks and rays that live in shallow water but it has slowly evolved into a much larger project containing information on all aspects of shark diving and shark photography.

There are now more than 10,000 shark pictures  and sections on shark evolution, biology, and conservation. There is a large library of reviewed shark books, a constantly updated shark taxonomy page, a monster list of shark links, and deeper in the site there are numerous articles and stories about shark encounters. Elasmodiver is now so difficult to check for updates, that new information and pictures are listed on an Elasmodiver Updates Page that can be accessed here:

WHAT'S NEW?

Shark picture - green sawfish

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BROWN CATSHARK

Brown Catshark

View all available Brown Catshark Pictures in the Shark Pictures Database

Common Names: Brown catshark.

Latin Name: Apristurus brunneus.

Family: Scyliorhinidae

Identification: Body coloration grey/brown to dark brown above, fading to light grey/brown or tan below.

Eyes bluish-green when reflecting light. Snout laterally depressed with bulges around nares (nasal openings) when viewed from above. Ridge along cheek. Subtle ridge over eye.

Nares large. Anterior nasal flaps large and triangular. Fourth and fifth gill openings over pectoral fins. Dorsal fins set slightly behind pelvic an anal fins. Dorsal fins long, low and with rounded trailing edges. Second dorsal slightly larger than first dorsal.

Size: Mature males 45-55cm. Mature females 48-58cm. Maximum size 69cm

Habitat:  On or far above the bottom. Muddy or sandy substrates. Sometimes on or adjacent to rocky reefs. Depth range from 33m to 1290m.

Abundance and distribution: Temperate eastern Pacific Ocean. From Southeastern Alaska to Northern Mexico. Also recorded from Panama, Ecuador and Peru but South American sightings may be a different species.

Behavior: Unknown.

Diet: Feeds primarily on penaeid shrimps. Also, pelagic crustaceans, squid and small bony fishes.

Reproduction: Oviparous. Egg cases may be 5x2.5cm. Egg cases are deposited year round. Juveniles may take more than two years to hatch.

Conservation Status: The IUCN lists the brown catshark as 'Data Deficient'.  Although Apristurus brunneus is reported to be a relatively common bycatch in deepwater trawl fisheries, insufficient catch and biological information is available to assess this species beyond Data Deficient. Species-specific monitoring of catches should be undertaken.

Photographs: Vancouver Island, Canada.

Similar species: The brown catshark shares parts of its range with a number of similar deepwater catsharks. One of the commonest being the filetail catshark Parmaturus xaniurus. The filetail catshark has a less laterally compressed head, and much larger dorsal fins - about the size of its pectoral and anal fins and a more rounded tail with a prominent caudal notch.

Another sympatric species is the longnose catshark Apristurus kampae. This catshark has a proportionately longer snout, large narrow nostrils and much longer (taller) gill openings.

Reaction to divers: The shallowest record of a brown catshark was from a trawl in 33m off of the Gulf Islands in British Columbia, Canada. However, this species rarely ventures into such shallow water so it is only rarely (if ever) encountered by divers.

Please contact Elasmodiver if you encounter this species: elasmodiver@gmail.com

Diving logistics: N/A.

 

 

 

 

 

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