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Not just a huge collection of Shark Pictures: Elasmodiver.com contains images of sharks, skates, rays, and a few chimaera's from around the world. Elasmodiver began as a simple web based shark field guide to help divers find the best places to encounter the different species of sharks and rays that live in shallow water but it has slowly evolved into a much larger project containing information on all aspects of shark diving and shark photography.

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Shark picture - green sawfish

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Longnose Stingray

longnose stingray dasyatis guttata

 

longnose stingray dasyatis guttata

 

View all available Longnose Stingray Images in the Shark Picture Database

 

Common Names: Longnose stingray.

 

Accepted Binomial: Dasyatis guttata.

 

Family: Dasyatidae.

 

Identification: The longnose stingray has a (slightly wider than long) rhomboid disc with a well produced snout, roughly straight anterior margins, obtusely angular free tips and convex posterior margins. The dorsal surface of the body disc is olive-grey to brown, usually with no obvious markings but sometimes with darker spots. A row of tubercles (enlarged dermal denticles) runs along the midline from behind eyes to the base of the tail. Ventral surface pale/white or yellowish. Tail long with a long, fleshy dorsal keel and a low ventral finfold. Usually one but sometimes multiple spines present on tail. Tail terminates in a long thin filament.

 

Size: Maximum length 2m. More commonly 1.25m.

 

Habitat: Found in shallow bays on the sand from 1m down to 36m. Sometimes adjacent to reefs. May move into brackish environments such as estuaries.

 

Distribution: Confined to the tropical Western Atlantic from the southern Gulf of Mexico southwards to Santos, Brazil.

 

Diet: The longnose stingray feeds mainly on benthic invertebrates including crustaceans, mollusks, echinoderms (sea cucumbers) and worms. Will also eat small fishes.

Reproduction: Ovoviviparous. Litter size 1-2. Gestation lasts approximately 5-6 months.

 

Conservation Status: Listed as 'Data Deficient by the IUCN. This is the most common ray species in artisanal fisheries in some states of Northeastern Brazil (Maranhão and Paraíba). Also taken as bycatch in shrimp trawls (Ceará) and a targeted species of sports surf fisheries (Paraíba). For some states, such as Ceará, Paraíba and Bahia, there are increasing fishing pressures on the species, but no population assessments based on these fisheries. Monitoring of artisanal fisheries directed towards this species, protection of breeding and nursery grounds, population studies and more information from its range outside Brazil are all required before the conservation status of the species can be accurately assessed.

 

Photographs: Gulf of Guatemala, Livingston, Guatemala, Caribbean Sea.

 

Similar species: The longnose stingray shares its Caribbean range with two other dasyatid stingrays. The Southern Stingray Dasyatis americana and the Roughtail Stingray Dasyatis centroura both have a more diamond/rhomboid disc with no obvious elongation of the snout.

 

Reaction to divers: Skittish. Not easily approached.

 

Diving Logistics: Although this ray is quite common along the east coast of Central America, it is not particularly easy to track down due to the lack of coastal dive shops on the mainland. Likely seen by coastal dive shops in Guatemala and Honduras.

A known nursery area for longnose stingrays occurs off the beaches of Caiçara do Norte in northeastern Brazil, where newborns and small juveniles have been reported from water no more than 3 m (9.8 ft) deep from February to October.

 

References and Citations:

Yokota, L. and R.P. Lessa (March 2006). "A nursery area for sharks and rays in northeastern Brazil". Environmental Biology of Fishes 75 (3): 349–360.

 

Thorson, T.B. (1983). "Observations on the morphology, ecology and life history of the euryhaline stingray, Dasyatis guttata (Bloch and Schneider) 1801". Acta Biologica Venezuelica 11 (4): 95–126.

 

Rosa, R.S. & Furtado, M. 2004. Dasyatis guttata. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2004: e.T44592A10911036. http://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2004.RLTS.T44592A10911036.en.

 

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